Mental Health Resources for Women

Mental health is undeniably a very serious matter- yet, many women still don’t have access to the resources that they need. 

Each stage of a woman’s life can create a unique set of challenges to their mental health. 

We hope to mitigate these challenges as much as possible, by providing a list of mental health resources for the many different stages of a woman’s life.  

Do you have a suggestion for an important resource we may have missed? Email us at molly@rosebudcbd.com


General Mental Health Resources for Women

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If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with a mental illness, or just has concerns about their mental health, there are many ways to find online through blog article, forums, chat groups and helpful studies. 

Below are some wonderful, general mental health resources for women.

Her Campushttps://www.hercampus.com

This article addresses some common signs of stress and anxiety, and offers some advice on handling the feeling of being “too stressed out” to function properly. 

National Alliance on Mental Illness – https://www.nami.org/

The National Alliance on Mental Illness is dedicated to building better lives for people who are struggling with mental illnesses by providing resources for family members and caregivers, and educating about mental health conditions.  

Good Therapyhttps://www.goodtherapy.org/

If you or someone you know is experiencing mental health or behavioral concerns, relationship issues, or other challenges, you can search their directory to find a qualified therapist in your city.

Help Yourself, Help Othershttps://www.helpyourselfhelpothers.org/

This website offers mental health screenings, that provides the quickest way of determining if and when you should talk to a mental health professional. Their program is anonymous and confidential. 

Blah Therapyhttps://blahtherapy.com/

Offering you the option between chatting with a stranger, or a certified therapist, this website creates a safe space for you to chat with someone about what’s bothering you. Vent, ask for advice, or simply chat- this is a “no-judgement” zone. 

Healthy Placehttps://www.healthyplace.com/

Providing a vast amount of information on mental health disorders and psychiatric medications, this site offers articles from both a patient and expert point of view. You can also find support in their online community of forums and blogs.

Beyond Bluehttps://www.beyondblue.org.au/

Although this site is based in Australia, it provides information and insight that people across the world can benefit from. Their aim is to make the issues of anxiety, depression and suicide part of daily conversations, and to end the stigma of mental health issues by encouraging the community to speak up and reach out. 

Happiful Magazinehttps://happiful.com/

Happiful provides helpful, inspiring stories about mental health and wellbeing. Happiful wants to spread positivity and support for people struggling with mental health issues, no matter the situation.

Go Ask Alice!https://goaskalice.columbia.edu/

Created to help young people navigate tough questions while also providing much-needed anonymity, this website contains a vast database of questions about a variety of concerns surrounding mental and emotional health.

Help Guidehttps://www.helpguide.org

200+ articles, and other helpful resources, that address topics on mental, emotional and social health.


Mental Health Resources for Women of Color

Studies have shown that women of color are far less likely to seek psychological services, and are often under-diagnosed with mental illness due to cultural barriers. 

Mental health is a challenging topic, and those who are attempting to improve the current situation must be not only understanding- but inclusive and intersectional as well. 

Mental illness does not discriminate. Expanding the mental health conversation to focus on minority voices is not only important- it is essential to creating long-lasting change in the mental health arena. 

Here are a few helpful mental health resources for women of color:

To Be Female, Anxious and Black – https://adaa.org

Written by Dr. Angela Neal-Barnett, a professor of Psychological Sciences at Kent State University, this article addresses a few of the mental health issues that black women face in today’s society. 

Black Women’s Health Imperativehttps://bwhi.org/

BWHI is a national nonprofit geared specifically towards improving the health and wellness of our nation’s Black women and girls. Find out about the most pressing health issues that affect Black women, and learn strategies to live a longer, healthier life.

Sister Lovehttps://www.sisterlove.org/

SisterLove is a women’s AIDS and reproductive justice nonprofit focusing on women, particularly women of African descent.

Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center – http://www.nativeshop.org

Find information on issues of health, education, land and water rights, and economic development of Native American people. The website’s Resource Center provides links to information on native women’s reproductive rights, educational materials, health reports, and action alerts.

Sharing Hopehttps://www.nami.org

This program is a 60-minute, “interactive dialogue” designed to increase mental health awareness in African American communities, by sharing the journey to recovery and exploring signs and symptoms of mental health conditions. The program additionally highlights how and where to find help.

Project Let’shttps://www.letserasethestigma.com

Project LETS is a national organization, led by women who have experienced mental illness, disability, trauma, & neurodivergence. 


Mental Health Resources for Moms

Motherhood is as wonderful as it is challenging, especially for new moms, or mothers who are struggling with fertility.

These resources below are designed specifically for moms who are struggling with a mental health issue, or simply need to feel like they are not alone. 

Benefits and Risks of Psychiatric Medications during Pregnancy http://www.aafp.org

This is a detailed look at the risks and benefits of taking medications while you are pregnant. Published in the American Family Physician, this article is pretty technical- but it provides a wealth of information for childbirth educators, nurses, and other healthcare providers committed to the health and wellness of mothers. 

Mom’s Mental Health Matters https://www1.nichd.nih.gov

This page helps new moms learn the signs that they might be facing a mental health issue, and educates new mothers on how and where to seek out the help they need.

Postpartum Progresshttps://postpartumprogress.com/

This site offers warm, positive, in-depth information for all new moms who experience postpartum depression, and other mental illnesses related to pregnancy and childbirth.  

Maternal Health Task Forcehttps://www.mhtf.org/topics/perinatal-mental-health/

MHTF provides a collaborative community of individuals who come together to help end maternal mortality and morbidity across the world. 

National Perinatal Associationhttp://www.nationalperinatal.org

Resources, tips and family support to educate moms, and to help them cope with the new challenges are associated with becoming a mom. 

Selenihttps://www.seleni.org/

You will find an extensive amount of helpful tips, tools and articles based on real-life experiences on this site- informed by expert insight, and written with compassion to empower moms so they can find the support they need.

Mother’s Mental Healthhttps://mothersmentalhealth.org/

This website provides moms with information and resources to all of those seeking to help women receive the best care possible including health care practitioners, obstetricians, primary care physicians, social service providers, mental health care practitioners, community agencies, friends and family, and not least of all, women who are seeking answers and tools to help themselves.

Healthy New Momshttps://healthynewmoms.org/

Though based out of Maryland, Healthy New Moms has plenty of online resources for new moms such as crisis lines, support groups, family and partner resources, educational material, and a directory for additional assistance.


Mental Health Resources for Older Women 

Physical changes in bodies and chemistry, changes in family relationships and friendships, changes in living situations; all of these changes can have a impact on an older women’s mental health. 

It’s important to prioritize your mental well-being as you get older, so here are a few resources to help you stay on top of your mental health as you age.

The North American Menopause Societyhttp://www.menopause.org/

Founded in 1989, The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women, during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging.

National Council on Aginghttps://www.ncoa.org

The National Council on Aging provides innovative community programs, services, online help, and advocacy for the aging community, to provide them with dignity, security and purpose. 

A Place for Momhttps://www.aplaceformom.com

“The statistics on mental illness in seniors are sobering, but with knowledge and vigilance, caregivers can stay aware of the emotional and mental health of their older loved ones and make sure they are properly treated if they are experiencing a problem.”

Healthy Aginghttps://www.hhs.gov/aging/healthy-aging/index.html

Senior Corp connects adults 55+ with the people and organizations that need them the most. You can find volunteer opportunities near you, and stay involved in your community. 

Young at Hearthttps://www.niddk.nih.gov

As you age, your body changes, and with it- what you need to stay healthy. Healthy eating and regular physical activity are your keys to good mental and physical health. The article offers tips for readers at various life stages, including adulthood, pregnancy, parenthood, and later life.


If you are experiencing thoughts or feelings of suicide, get help immediately by calling the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255

We do not intend for this article to be a substitute for professional medical advice or treatment. We encourage you to always seek the advice of a physician, psychologist or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a possible medical condition. 

Please never disregard professional medical advice, or delay in seeking appropriate medical advice because of something you have read on The Bloom.

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